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COMPUTERS

DEPARTMENT OF computers


History of computers:


The Department of Computer Science was established in the year 1994 with MPCS-Group around 30 students and is one of the earliest Computer Science departments in Telangana state. Currently, it has 13 faculty members and over 3000 students working towards their Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. In addition, it actively participates in select off-campus programmes.

The Department of Computer Science offers programs of study related to computing, information technology and software design and application. Our programs involve interdepartmental, multi-institutional and inter-institutional collaboration and have attracted faculty members, undergraduate and graduate students from all over the state.

The department attracts high quality students from all over India and has an impressive placement record.

One of the strengths of the department is its strong entrepreneurial culture and many students have successfully involved themselves in creating entrepreneurial ventures some of which have gone fully commercial within a short span of time.

In the recent past, we had benchmarked our curriculum with select institutions of higher learning around the world and currently we are carefully reviewing the impact of these consequent changes with a view to make our programmes even more strong and competitive.


Why Study Computer Science?


Do you want to have a career in computing? The New Science Degree & PG College 's Department of Computer Science can take you there. Computing is a growing field with exciting challenges and opportunities. Not only does every business, large and small, need a website, a network, and computer resources, Computer scientists are central to many other fields, from developing video games to driving the Mars Rover to CT-scans in hospitals to predicting the weather. At the New Science Degree & PG College, you will learn how to program computers for simple and complex tasks; you will learn about computer graphics and animation.

Wireless Fidelity

It gives us immense pleasure to announce that we have taken a big leap forward by launching Wireless. Fidelity (Wi-Fi) in campus. Our students now have 24x7 wireless connectivity providing access to enormous amount of information available on the World Wide Web. The Students as well as Staff with their Laptops can access to internet anywhere in our campus


COURSE NAME DESCRIPTION DURATION
M.P.Cs (EM) Maths, Physics & Computer Science 3
M.St.Cs (EM) Maths, Statistics & Computer Science 3
M.E.Cs (EM) Maths, Electronics & Computer Science 3
M.C.Cs (EM) Maths, Chemistry & Computer Science 3
M.G.Cs (EM) Maths, Geology & Computer Science 3
B.Z.CA (EM) Botany, Zoology & Computer Application 3
B.Com (EM & TM) Computer Applications 3
B.Com (EM & TM) General 3
B.B.M (EM) Bachelor of Business Management 3
NAME IMAGES DESIGNATION EXPERIENCE PHONE NO EMAIL ID
MR R.OMPRAKASH M.SC(CS),M.TECH Vice Principal 21 Yrs 8019437927 om5176@gmail.com
MR G. PARAMESHWAR M.C.A., B.Ed H.O.D 10 Yrs 9966885952 gparamesh2010@gmail.com
MR G. VENUGOPAL M.SC(COMP. SCI) Lecturer10 Yrs 7207638063 ginukala.venugopal@gmail.com
MR N. MAHENDER M.C.A Lecturer 8 Yrs 9966437969 mahi.nagurla@mail.com
MR L. GUNAKAR RAO M.C.A., MA(ENG) Lecturer 10 Yrs 9959320104 ladegunakarrao@gmail.com
MR MOHD. BABAR M.C.A Lecturer 13 Yrs 9866918998 mohdbabarshaik@gmail.com
MS S. MAMATHA M.Tech(csc) Lecturer 4 Yrs 8186834669 mamathasribadri@gmail.com
MR N. VINOD M.C.A Lecturer 7 Yrs 9652673794 nvinod0808@gmail.com
MS B. ANJANI M.Tech Lecturer 5 Yrs 9502390869 anjanibeeravelli@gmail.com
MR K.SANTHOSH B.Tech Programmer 7 Yrs 9492003285 santhosh.kamagonii@gmail.com
MR Ch. DEVARAJ M.C.A Programmer 8 Yrs 9701417718 devaraju.ch1@gmail.com

BCOM(computer applications)


SNO SYLLABUS DOWNLODE
1 2nd YEAR I-SEM
2 3rd YEAR I-SEM
3 3rd YEAR II-SEM
4 IT I-SEM

BSC(life sciences)


SNO SYLLABUS DOWNLODE
1 ALL SEM SYLLABUS

BSC(maths)


SNO SYLLABUS DOWNLODE
1 1st YEAR I-SEM
2 1st YEAR II-SEM
3 2nd YEAR I-SEM
4 2nd YEAR II-SEM
5 3nd YEAR I-SEM
6 3nd YEAR II-SEM

Classroom participation

Classroom participation is a feature of many course designs. It can result in insightful comments and interesting connections being made by students, and can foster a high level of energy and enthusiasm in the classroom learning environment.

What is a seminar discussion?

Although “seminar” can mean a course with different speakers at each class, here we are using it to mean a small, discussion-based course. In a seminar course, students do assigned reading and then, under your guidance and direction, grapple aloud with the ideas they've read

Encouraging Class Participation

Class participation is an important aspect of student learning. When students speak up in class, they learn to express their ideas in a way that others can understand. When they ask questions, they learn how to obtain information to enhance their own understanding of a topic.

Class participation also is a valuable learning tool for teachers. Through students' questions, you learn what they don't understand, and can adjust your instruction accordingly.

Just as speaking in front of a group doesn't come easily to many adults, however, speaking up in class is a struggle for many students. That struggle might manifest itself in the classroom in a variety of ways -- not volunteering to answer questions, not asking for help, not speaking up in small-group activities, even not talking in class at all.

As a teacher, you will have greater success spurring a student to speak up if you can figure out why he is reluctant to participate. Whatever the reason for his reticence, your role is not to force him to speak; doing so will more likely make him clam up than open up. Your role is to provide a supportive, encouraging climate that helps him feel more comfortable, more confident, and less fearful of speaking up.

CONTRIBUTING TO SEMINARS

Introduction

Seminars and tutorials are a vital part of most academic courses and give you an opportunity to discuss topics and issues with other students, teaching assistants and members of academic staff. This sort of critical debate and argument is very useful in developing your grasp and understanding of your subject. Benefits associated with seminars and tutorials include opportunities to:

Apply knowledge from your lectures and background reading;

Solve problems in a team to maximise your creativity;

Test your understanding and develop new insights;

Learn from other people’s approaches and ideas;

Clarify any concepts that you might not have understood.

The success of a good seminar is not only based on its content (the subject knowledge explored) but also upon the way in which the seminar group works together. Students are often invited to take a lead role in the preparation of the seminar, chairing the discussion, solving problems or making a presentation to start the session. Learning through small group discussion will thus help you develop essential skills for later life, including opportunities to:

Practice expressing yourself;

Practice and develop your group skills (e.g. listening to and supporting others);

Prepare and deliver oral presentations.

1. Preparation

It is important to come to each seminar or tutorial group prepared to take a full part in discussion. If you have a basic understanding of the topic you will be better able to participate in discussion and understand the material being explored.

Begin by identifying the main issues to be discussed. This information should be in your module handbook(s) or be available from your course tutor.

Carry out background reading/research to develop your understanding and interest

Make notes as you read, focusing your thoughts on the forthcoming topic.

Keep track of useful examples or quotations as these will provide important evidence for discussion.

Develop both a broad understanding of the subject matter as well as a list of things that you’re having difficulty with. These latter can form the basis for questions or contributions to the discussion.

Make a list of points that you’d like to make or problems you’d like to find solutions to. Keep open minded though, as they might not all be relevant.

Remember, the key to successful discussion is for everyone to be fully engaged not for everyone to have fully developed ideas. A questioning approach to your preparation opens your mind and creates fertile ground for discussion and debate.

2. Engaging in discussion

It isn’t always easy to contribute to discussions, even if you have prepared thoroughly. Many students worry that they may have got something ‘wrong’ in their preparatory work and that everyone else has the ‘right’ answer. This is rarely the case. To help overcome nerves and anxiety, it is worth remembering the following points:

Don't wait until you arrive at the ‘big idea’: say something simple and often to help build discussion;

Share responsibility with the group: don’t dominate or leave others to do all of the talking;

Be positive and respectful of other people's ideas.

With these principles in mind, try using the following strategies to help build your contributions to group discussions. They start with low stress approaches and build to full involvement.

a. Verbal/non-verbal acknowledgements

Show that you’re a good listener by paying close attention to what is being said. Acknowledge other people’s contributions by saying “yes” or nodding your head. Speakers find such signals reassuring as they show their ideas are being listened to and valued. These listening strategies will also keep you active and involved, giving a good starting point for more substantial contributions.

b. Agreements

Agreeing with a point someone has made can take your contributions to the next stage. Statements like “That’s a good idea” or “I’d not thought of that” offer non-threatening speaking strategies. You can then build this to more complex levels of agreement, stating where and why you agree, for example: “Yes, it’s important to realise that Kushner has been read out of context.”

c. Observation

Try commenting on the discussion, showing other group members that you’re aware of what’s going on and are playing an active role in listening and shaping the argument. This can be particularly useful when trying to avoid distractions and keeping the discussion on course: “Haven’t we moved away from the point that Manjit was making about ...?”

d. Presenting alternative views

Offering alternative points of view indicates a high level of involvement and can be a very effective way of helping to develop your own ideas and the ideas of others. Don’t be afraid to disagree with someone, simply make sure that you do so in a constructive way. First express your disagreement by showing you understand the point that was being made and then explain why you disagree. If you are unsure as to why you disagree, try doing so with a question: “But doesn’t that contradict with...?”

e. Involvement

This level shows very strong levels of engagement. In addition to all of the above strategies, the involved student will also try to make new points, leading the discussion into new ground: “I think we need to look more closely at the impact of…”. The involved student will also try to bring other people into the discussion, inviting comment or drawing upon someone with relevant experience.

SNO CLASS YEAR NAME
1 MCCS-II 2ndYEAR DESHAGANI MOUNIKA
2 MECS-II 2ndYEAR TEJAVATH VEERANNA
3 MGCS-II 2ndYEAR DHARMASOTH GANESH
4 MPC-II 2ndYEAR GATTU KEERTHANA
5 MPCS-II 2ndYEAR SAMREEN
6 MPE-II 2ndYEAR PAINDLA RANJITH
7 MPG-II 2ndYEAR SOUNDARI ANIL
8 MSTCS-II 2ndYEAR NEELAM SOUJANYA
9 BCOM CA EM-II 2ndYEAR VANKUDOTH MOUNIKA
10 BCOM CA TM-II 2ndYEAR LAUDYA BHEEMA